Chapter 174

1.

Establishes a lopsided collective
bargaining
scheme that favors police associations and
negates accountability.

2.

Favors police associations and gives officers the benefit of the doubt when misconduct disputes are brought to the attention of local governments
(174.004).

3.

Allows police association contracts to overrule important public accountability provisions, such as rules set by the Civil Service Commission.
(174.005).

4.

Does not require the association representatives to consider city concerns, such as police accountability or public trust in the police department
(174.156).

5.

Used to bargain for benefits outside the normal scope for police officers. It cannot be used to limit their already expansive protections (174.007).

Chapter 143

1.

Chapter 143 gives police one-sided “due process” protections that undermine justice and accountability.

2.

Prevents Police
Departments from disciplining officers for
misconduct more than 180 days after the conduct
occurred—
no matter how egregious or dangerous
the officer’s actions. (143.052(h))

3.

Sets up
unreasonable standards for due process, then creates
a loophole
for an officer to avoid culpability if any of
a myriad of mistakes are made during the investigative process. (143.123(k))

4.

70% of officers
fired by the SAPD are
reinstated by arbitrators who
are
not accountable to the public. These officers not
only
avoid consequences for their actions, they are rewarded for their misconduct with overtime pay.
(143.123(B)(2))

5.

Endangers and
discourages
individuals who log complaints about officers by requiring the name of the
complainant to be disclosed
to the officer being investigated.
(143.123(f))

We are not against police associations or collective bargaining. The practice of Chapter 143 gives police associations power to impede justice. The practice of Chapter 174 sets an unfair negotiation standard with police associations.

© 2020 by Fix S.A.P.D 

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